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Distractions Can Hurt Memory
Distractions Can Hurt Memory Older people are much likelier to suffer memory and cognitive impairment when they’re presented with “environmental distractions” such as material that’s irrelevant to the task at hand. The finding, by psychologists from Rice University and Johns Hopkins University, is the first to convincingly demonstrate impairment from environmental distractions, such as irrelevant speech... Forward>>
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For Some Older Women, Calcium Supplements Up Risk of Kidney Stones
For Some Older Women, Calcium Supplements Up Risk of Kidney Stones Calcium and vitamin D are commonly recommended for older women, but the usual supplements may send calcium excretion and blood levels too high for some women, according to a study published online June 18th 2014 in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. Excess blood and urine calcium levels may lead to kidney stones or other problems. The study will... Forward>>
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Serious Cycling (More Than 3 Hours a Week) Could Endanger Men’s Sexual Health
Serious Cycling (More Than 3 Hours a Week) Could Endanger Men’s Sexual Health Changing up your bicycle seat can help deflect ED risk. Regular exercisers report fewer sex problems and more erotic enjoyment. But extended cycling — more than three hours a week on a narrow, banana-shaped "long-nose" bike seat — can cause erection impairment. Fortunately, cyclists can ride for any amount of time they like and incur a low risk of sex problems if they update their bike... Forward>>
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Drugs Protect Against Post-Stroke Damage
Drugs Protect Against Post-Stroke Damage Anticoagulant medications such as Warfarin have long been known to help prevent strokes, but now a large Danish study has shown that the blood thinners can also reduce the risk of death and brain damage when a stroke happens anyway. The research was published in Stroke - Journal of the American Heart Association. A release from the university quotes senior research consultant Søren Paaske... Forward>>
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Nutrition Guidelines Needed for Full-Service Restaurants
Nutrition Guidelines Needed for Full-Service Restaurants You avoid fast food chains and patronize full-service chains instead, so you’re eating healthy. Right? Maybe not. According to a study done at Drexel University and the University of Pennsylvania, food served at full-service restaurant chains is typically high in calories, saturated fat, and sodium. The team maintains that standard definitions are needed for ''healthy choice'' tags and for entrées targeted... Forward>>
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Friends Can Save Your Life: How Friends Keep You Healthy
Friends Can Save Your Life: How Friends Keep You Healthy Sometimes it’s not easy to stay in touch with friends and distant family members, but there’s every reason in the world to do it. Not only do tight friendships and strong family offer an emotional connection, research shows when we have close ties, especially with upbeat buddies, we’re more likely to take better care of ourselves, feel less stressed – even live longer. A research team at Brigham... Forward>>
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Faster Diagnoses with New Method
Faster Diagnoses with New Method The more accurately healthcare providers can diagnose a disease, the greater the chance that the patient will survive. To that end, researchers at the Nano-Science Center of the University of Copenhagen have discovered a method that will make the process faster, cheaper, and more accurate. The team has combined advanced tools used in physics for research in biology at nanoscale... Forward>>
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Red Wine Keeps on Fighting Cancer
Red Wine Keeps on Fighting Cancer Reserveratol, the now-famous chemical is red wine, turns out to remain effective against cancer even after the body converts it into other compounds. That is the encouraging finding of research done at the University of Leicester in the UK and published in the journal Science Translational Medicine. A release from the university notes that this is an important discovery because resveratrol... Forward>>
Research
Four Surprising Reasons Why Women Cheat
Four Surprising Reasons Why Women Cheat Men are thought to be hard-wired to commit infidelity -- but in reality, women are cheating more than men in the modern age, according to a recent infidelity survey by Coffee and Company, a British marriage bureau. Of the 3,000 respondents, over 20 percent of women admit to cheating. Similarly, in the Great Male Survey 2010 and Great Female Survey 2010 by AskMen.com, 5 percent... Forward>>
Research
Lessons from an Immortal Microbe
Lessons from an Immortal Microbe An international team of researchers has found a yeast microbe called S. pombe that is capable of rejuvenating every time it reproduces as long as conditions are right. The study, published in the journal Current Biology, provides fundamental insights into the mechanisms of aging and could potentially serve as a model of certain non-aging types of cells in humans. A release from the University of Bristol... Forward>>
Research
Study: Coffee Prolongs Life
Study: Coffee Prolongs Life Coffee seems to be good for you. Or at least it's not bad, say researchers who led the largest-ever study of coffee and health. They found that coffee drinkers seemed a little more likely to live longer than folks who drink no coffee at all. Regular or decaf didn't matter. That's reassuring because a few studies in the past suggested coffee might be harmful. Results of the latest study are published... Forward>>
Research
Saliva Analysis Shows Possible Link Between Cell Phones and Cancer
Saliva Analysis Shows Possible Link Between Cell Phones and Cancer By analyzing the saliva of frequent cell phone users, researchers from Tel Aviv University (TAU) have discovered new evidence suggesting the mobile devices could increase a person’s risk of developing cancer. Dr. Yaniv Hamzany of TAU’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine and the Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Department at the Rabin Medical Center in Israel selected saliva for analysis due... Forward>>
Research
Is There an Aspirin-Eye Disease Link?
Is There an Aspirin-Eye Disease Link? Millions of older Americans take low-dose aspirin for prevention of heart attack or stroke, so two new studies suggesting that long-term regular aspirin use might increase the risk for developing a vision-robbing eye disease could be a cause for worry. The most recent study found that those who used aspirin one or more times per week in the previous year were more than twice as likely to develop... Forward>>
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Is The Humble Potato The Key To Fighting Chronic Potassium Deficiency?
Is The Humble Potato The Key To Fighting Chronic Potassium Deficiency? New research presented Tuesday at the annual Experimental Biology 2013 conference in Boston, Massachusetts points to a link between consuming white potatoes and an increased intake of potassium. According to the study, for each additional kilocalorie of white potatoes consumed by adults 19 years of age and older, there was a corresponding 1.6 mg increase in potassium intake... Forward>>
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Too Much Sitting Could Kill You Say Researchers
Too Much Sitting Could Kill You Say Researchers Bad news for desk jockeys, truck drivers and online journalists: A new study performed by Kansas State University researcher Richard Rosenkranz has found the more people sit, the more likely they are to develop a chronic disease. Rosenkranz and collaborators Emma George and Gregory Kolt from the University of Western Sydney studied the effect of sitting on middle-aged Australian... Forward>>
Research
Cardiac disease elevates cognitive impairment risk
Cardiac disease elevates cognitive impairment risk An elderly adult with a heart condition is more likely to develop a form of MCI than one without such an ailment, researchers say. As the nation’s population grows older, it’s increasingly important that physicians be aware of common health problems that can increase patients’ risk of developing cognitive impairment, according to researchers at Mayo Clinic. One such health problem to watch... Forward>>
Research
Good Mood Boosts Seniors’ Brain Power
Good Mood Boosts Seniors’ Brain Power Want to improve your memory and mental sharpness? Turn that frown upside down. That’s the latest word from Ohio State University researchers who found simply being in a good mood helps boost brain power in seniors — improving their working memory and decision making. The study, published in the journal Cognition and Emotion, is the first to show that the power of a positive attitude... Forward>>
Research
Being lonely is bad for health, conference told
Being lonely is bad for health, conference told THE lonely plight of many elderly Ulster residents was put under the spotlight on Thursday. A gathering of around 80 people, including social workers, volunteers and members of housing associations, heard that loneliness can help to increase instances of dementia, stress and even raise blood pressure. Among those speaking at the conference was the Rt Rev Dr Christopher Herbert, former Bishop... Forward>>
Research
Older women drink warning
Older women drink warning Middle-aged women are being warned to watch their drinking after health experts said they were significantly more at risk than younger women. Women's health advisers say women aged in their 40s and 50s are drinking more because they tend to be more financially secure, are less likely to have young children to look after and use alcohol to relax after work.The organisation Jean... Forward>>
Research
Marriage is good for the heart: study
Marriage is good for the heart: study Married people are less prone to heart attacks than singletons and more likely to recover if stricken, according to a Finnish study published Thursday. Researchers collected data on 15,330 people in Finland between the ages of 35 and 99 who suffered "acute coronary events" between 1993 and 2002. Just over half of the patients died within 28 days of the attacks. The team found... Forward>>
Research
Loneliness affects health in unexpected ways
Loneliness affects health in unexpected ways Not having many friends, or people you can talk to or rely on, has already been linked to depression for obvious reasons, but now new research indicates that it even has an effect on your body's inflammatory response to illness. Researchers from the Institute for Behavioural Medicine Research at Ohio State University looked at data based on a series of studies on a group of breast cancer... Forward>>
Research
First large scale community study into the value of group singing for older people with lung disease
First large scale community study into the value of group singing for older people with lung disease The research was undertaken by Canterbury Christ church University's Sidney De Haan Research Centre for Arts and Health, following a grant of £130,000 from The Dunhill Medical Trust. Key findings from the ten month study include evidence of significant improvement in measures of lung function and health related quality of life for participants in the singing groups, as well as social... Forward>>
Research
Heart disease link to erection problems
Heart disease link to erection problems Even mild erection problems could be flagging up hidden heart disease in men, experts claim. They might also be a warning of possible premature death, a study has shown. Affected men aged 45 and over with no previous history of heart conditions face an increased risk of heart attacks, heart failure and arterial disease, researchers found. Severe erectile dysfunction (ED) almost doubled... Forward>>
Research
Does getting more sleep reduce memory loss?
Does getting more sleep reduce memory loss? "Boosting sleep 'may slow memory rot'," says the BBC, in a headline that could provide us with a plausible excuse to give our bosses when we fall asleep at our desks. The news is based on a complex study that involved testing younger and older people's memories before and after sleep. Researchers gave participants word pairs to remember in the evening, tested them on half of the word... Forward>>
Research
Negative emotions cause diseases
Negative emotions cause diseases Scientist and physicians around the world have come to the conclusion that the mental condition of a person greatly influences the state of their health. Scientists find more evidences, which show that 90% of diseases have psychosomatic nature. Ancient Greek physicians have already known about the wholeness of the human body and spirit, connecting each organ to corresponding emotion... Forward>>
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